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Adventure Tours

Talkeetna Day fishing

There are more then a dozen tributary streams that feed into the Susitna River in the greater Talkeetna area.  Each of these streams have plenty of salmon to catch. Salmon are present in that portion of the Susitna River system from June- October. The best fishing for silver salmon is late August to early September. Many also contain native rainbow trout, and char. Access to productive fishing areas is by boat or on foot, then fishing can be done by wading or fishing from shore.

All fishing equipment is provided on guided trips.  Fly fishing or spin fishing are both effective for salmon and trout.  

 

The XYZ chain of lakes near Talkeetna offer peaceful canoeing through several lakes interconnected by portage trails.  Enjoy listening to the common and grey loons, watching moose, beavers and waterfowl, and even do some fishing for rainbow trout.  We use 17 foot, 2 person, light-weight, stable, Old Towne brand canoes on our paddling tours. Canoe, life vests and paddles are provided.  If you want to fish, please let me know in advance, and I will bring the appropriate fishing gear.

 

Hiking 

Montana Creek Falls.  Total distance 7 miles.  

This scenic trail hike requires multiple stream crossings, so wear shoes that you don’t mind getting wet.  The route follows Montana Creek for 3.5 miles to the falls. Enjoy watching king, and chum salmon as they actively spawn in the clear, shallow gravel runs.  Both brown bears, and black bears can be seen fishing for salmon in this area.  It’s also common to spot bears and moose on this hike.

 

Kesugi Ridge trail.

The hike begins in lush boreal forests of lowland birch, spruce and cottonwood along Troublesome Creek, steadily climbing until you come out  above the tree line onto the alpine tundra of the Kesugi Ridge.  The highlight of this trail system is the fantastic view of Denali and the Alaska Range you get on a clear day from the alpine areas of Kesugi Ridge.  There are four trail access points on the Alaska Highway with more then 36 miles of continuous trail. Kesugi, 2,500 to 4,700 feet in elevation, is a big raised block of earth between the Chulitna and Susitna Rivers, thrust into the sky by the same faulting that produced the Alaska Range and its high point, Denali. Kesugi means “the ancient one” in the Dena’ina Athabaskan language. The hike is challenging. Besides the climb to the ridge, there are several ups and downs of hundreds of feet while on the ridge route.

Portions of this trail can be done on day trips, but to truly experience this trail requires a 2-4 day backpack trip.

 

Swan lakes/ Swanson River Canoe Area

This wonderland of interconnecting lakes is one of the few areas on the Kenai Peninsula that you can get away from the crowds of tourists that the Kenai and Russian Rivers have become known for.  This is truly a special place, where, with a day of paddling, and portaging, you can literally have a lake to yourself.

The Swan Lake Route is the most popular of the two systems, covering 60 miles and 30 lakes and connected by shorter portages with access to the 17 mile long Moose River. Canoeing on this system offers not only scenic beauty, but excellent wildlife viewing and good rainbow trout fishing.

We use 17 foot, 2 person, light-weight, stable, Old Towne brand canoes on our paddling tours. Canoe, life vests and paddles are provided.  If you want to fish, please let me know in advance, and I will bring the appropriate fishing gear.

King Salmon

The Nushagak River is located in Southwestern Alaska and flows about 242 miles from its headwaters, into Bristol Bay, near Dillingham. The Nushagak River supports one of the largest Chinook salmon runs on planet earth, with runs over 100,000 kings common.  In 2015 it was closer to 150,000 kings.

Nearly all those fish enter the river system in a short 6 week run, making the Nushagak truly the most specular king salmon fishery worldwide.  The Nushagak also hosts runs of chum, sockeye, pink, silver salmon and native populations of rainbow, grayling, char, pike and white fish. The relatively uncrowded river and its abundance of fish is what makes the Nushagak a unique destination for anglers.